Kim Hargreaves has a new pattern book out, called Heartfelt! It’s lovely, like pretty much all her patterns. I might even buy it one of these days, but it would cost about $44 once you figure in the shipping, so I’m not going to spring for it until I’m 100% ready to cast on.

I think pretty much all the shapes are rehashes of things she’s done before (probably not this one, though!), but that’s fine by me, since the predecessor patterns are only available as part of fearsomely expensive kits. My favorites:

  • Faith, which has a lovely garter lace insert in the front. I think this might not be the most flattering garment for me, though… I suspect it loses its gamine charm when worn outside this English countryside photoshoot
  • Emily, so elegant with the gently puffed bishop sleeves. I love this look, even though not everyone does… Jerry Seinfeld famously complained about the puffy shirt, and someone on some message board uncharitably described the sleeves on the Luna Dress as “pollen sacs”
  • Cherish, a classic bolero done in Rowan Big Wool. I was looking for the other bolero she had that looks just like this in a smaller gauge… I’d been eyeing it for a while. It might be this one, Splendour, but I seem to remember it being done in red Summer Tweed and photographed with the model leaning against a window on the left side of the frame. (Ravelry reveals that this was published as a kit in the Evergreen collection, no longer available through Kim Hargreaves’s site)
  • Darcy, a fitted seed stitch cardigan–almost a blazer, really–with pleated peplum.
  • Dusk, a kimono-esque wrap cardigan that reminds me a lot of the Catherine Lowe pattern from Knitknit (which I had to return to the library before getting a chance to scan some pictures for a review)

I don’t have much else to report. The piping for the Burda Style dress is kicking my ass… the bias binding I bought was too narrow, so I had to re-fold it in half instead of thirds, I had some trouble figuring out the zipper foot on the machine, the machine kept getting stuck on the multiple layers of fabric when I was trying to baste the piping on… then, after a couple of frustrating hours, I had it all put together and sat there trying to fold it in such a way that the piping would stick out of the front instead of out of the inside seam. Yup, I spent a couple of hours sewing it on upside down. Aside from my own stupidity, and the instructions to “baste the right side of the piping strap onto the neckline,” I blame the Burda tutorial that used stealthy black piping for the photos, with just a red dotted line drawn on in MS Paint to show where the piping cord should be. I, of course, thought I had figured out which way the piping was oriented and got it completely wrong. I also sewed it way too close to the edge so that it would have been sewn into the seam allowance, but fortunately figured this out before re-basting it (hand-basted the second time, thank God, I don’t know why I thought it would be faster to do it with the machine the first time around). Thank you, Sandra Betzina! (I bought this Power Sewing book for a few bucks at a local bookstore’s closing sale and should have consulted it before trying to use the internet tutorials. It finally made the piping stuff pretty clear.)

Bottom line, I didn’t knit a single stitch this weekend. I did sew on 4 out of the 6 buttons for Jess–I have to make another trip to Jo-Ann to buy the other two buttons. These are the ones I picked–La Mode vintage reproduction buttons, model 1711, circa 1941.

I also spent some crafty energy making some Fandango masks out of paper bags and junk mail for a costume party Friday night. I made one for my boyfriend, he kept balking at wearing it, and eventually I discovered that he had no idea what the Fandango paper bag ads were and thought I’d just made him a shoddy, crazy-looking paper bag mask to wear over his head for no apparent reason.  We did some other Halloween-type stuff, like watching a series of short and extremely gory plays called “Shocktoberfest” and visiting the cider mill. Hurray for autumn!

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